Okay that teaser was a whopper! So many more questions raised, none were really answered! Starting the night with a flashback set fifteen years in the past, we learn a little bit about this mystery cult with soul swapping powers (a power still not pictured without one of the Brotzmans present). We are introduced to a new player who is referred to as “the Supreme Soul,” who then forces the soul (one of the original souls) inhabiting famous rocker Lux Dujour into Gordon Rimmer, the man we know as Lydia Spring’s kidnapper. They also reveal the Supreme Being has been inhabiting many different bodies in the past ten years so whatever is going on started at least 25 years before the present. Also revealed is that they are looking for a second machine made by Lydia’s grandfather, Edgar Spring. Cut to the near past, where we see Lydia confronting Gordon Rimmer about what happened to her mother and asking about who Zachariah Webb is. Gordon claims to know what happened to her mother and lures her into his house. At the end of the episode we find Gordon at a strange place with a bunch of his dead followers, and then finds out over the radio that the body of Lux Dujuor had been discovered, which sends him into a fit.

In the present, we find Farrah, Dirk, and Todd investigating the room she was held captive in before going to Gordon’s house, which Todd and Dirk burned down by accident last episode. After an awkward exchange between Todd and Farrah, Dirk and Farrah head over to the Spring estate to collect her things, but not before Farrah uses Dirk’s phone to call Gordon who mentions Lydia’s father, Patrick, was going to hand over the second machine to Gordon’s group before he died. Lydia drops a bunch of exposition about the Springs owning Zachariah Webb’s former mansion and that her own father worked for Mr. Spring as his Chief of Security before she did. They are then given a map from Patrick Spring’s lawyer that leads them to a room in the basement of the mansion containing a strange machine, a magic lightbulb, and what appears to be schematics for something.

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We find Amanda, played by the excellent Hannah Marks, walking to the grocery store while being followed by the Rowdy 3. She manages to make it all the way to the checkout counter before having an episode, where she ends up catching fire in her mind. While this is going on, Todd is with the two detectives from Missing Persons and he tells them all about the kidnapper and the bridge and whatnot. Unbeknownst to him the two detectives just discovered the dog who is inhabited by the soul of Lydia Spring, moments before his arrival. During their conversation Todd receives a frantic call from Amanda in the grocery store and excuses himself to go pick her up. In the parking lot, Amanda is fully engulfed in flames (in her mind) as the Rowdy 3 come to her rescue… but doing their life force sucking thing again. Except this time, we see Amanda experience some trippy visions before waking up in her garage with her groceries. Todd then shows up and convinces her to come home with him.

Upon returning to Todd’s apartment, we find Farrah and Dirk in the kitchen scouring over the “schematics” they found in the secret room at the Spring estate. Amanda sheds some light on the case as she notices it is a map of the power grid, running from the Spring/former Webb mansion to directly under Todd’s apartment complex. Yet again, things get too heavy for Todd who needs a breather in the hallway and of course Dirk follows him out. They have another heart to heart where Todd accepts the holistic nature of the events that are happening to him, telling us that the apartment building/part of town was built by Edgar Spring back in the day.

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Checking in on our military friends, Col. Riggins gives Cpl. Friedkin (and us) a refresher on Project Black Wing at the beginning of the episode. It seems their mission was to find individuals with sensory abilities beyond the normal human scale. Now they must bring in Project Icarus (Dirk) before the government sends out some lethal force to do it. As Dirk goes to the car to get his magic lightbulb, he runs into Col. Riggins who wants to have a little chat but not before Cpl. Idiot Friedkin sacks Dirk into the stairs. We learn that Dirk’s real name is Svlad, which Dirk quickly states is not his name anymore. Dirk opens up about having friends and the progress he was making on the case and nearly brings us to tears.

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Meanwhile, our other favorite couple, Bart and Ken, have a lovely conversation about how the radio works while listening to the Backstreet Boys before a shotgun blast through the rear window causes the car to crash for some reason. Apparently the biker I deemed a serial killer last episode was apart of an entire gang that kills people and chops up their cars, a gang who were not too pleased their boy got killed in last week’s episode. When Bart and Ken wake up, they’re tied to a chicken wire fence on a post in a field. The bikers reappear and are about to kill the two when a baseball throw goes awry, allowing our holistic assassin free to go on another murder spree. At the end of it, Ken accepts the holistic nature of the events that are happening to them, much like his counterpart Todd did. They keep having mirrored scenes in each episode, so it will be interesting to see what happens when the two pairs meet. Bart and Ken ride off into the distance in brand new biker gear with affirmation in the mission: kill Dirk Gently.

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My Thoughts:

One of the things I love about this show is the atmosphere. The score does a great job to signal danger or mystery depending on the moment. It adds to the creep factor of Gordon and Bart, which honestly doesn’t need amplifying. Everything is deliberate, random names mentioned at the start of the episode will slowly be revealed to be someone integral to the investigation by the end of it. Every little detail is mapped out to be absorbed over the entirety of the episode, but if you miss it, you’re screwed. This is not something to watch while multi-tasking and it has captivated me enough that I actively watch it.

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Katherine intimated that she had seen the first three episodes of the show when she wrote her review of it, and that its erratic way of telling the story left no substance to the characters. I still don’t understand her reasoning for that conclusion because that moment in the hallway with Riggins and Dirk made me somewhat emotional. The look of pain in his eyes while trying to explain he has friends and a purpose now was real and I felt it. These characters are interesting, the team seems to have been formed, and there are still mysteries aplenty. I really enjoy the fact that the team wasn’t instantly put together at the end of the first episode, I think they’ve got the pacing down pretty well. The information isn’t doled out all at once, but it’s not padded with irrelevant things in the episodes thus far. Just like the tag line from the show, everything is connected. What do you think? Is your brain keeping up with the large packets of information they’re throwing at it? Yet again, I wish I could marathon it on Netflix, because it is one of those shows that either require multiple viewings or to power through all at once so you don’t forget the smaller details.

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Quotes of the week:

  • “My clothes look good on you.”
  • “Correct, absolutely no one has any idea what’s going on.”
  • “Fat people?”
  • “I don’t know anything – ever. It’s really quite relaxing.”
  • “I ran, and then I took the bus, and then I ran some more.”
  • “The amount of stuff he doesn’t know is stupefying, it would blow your mind.”